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Author Topic: New Member Intro and SHOULD I BUY THIS CBR600RR  (Read 1594 times)

2007CBR600RR

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New Member Intro and SHOULD I BUY THIS CBR600RR
« on: October 27, 2015, 09:53:33 AM »
Hi everyone.

My name is Aidan and I am a fairly new rider, with about a thousand miles under my belt on a Triumph Tiger 800 XC (big ole dual sport) after taking a MSF course. Originally was going to do the 300cc route with a cbr or something to get some experience, but I had an amazing opportunity to borrow the Tiger. So though it is somewhat taboo, I learned to ride on not only an 800, but also a 475 pound dual sport. It has been a blast!


Though with that being said, the adventure bike isn't for me. I would prefer an aggressive supersport, and that's where I found myself looking at the typical cbr600rr, r6, gsxr-600 etc.
At my LBS, they have a 2007 CBR600RR with 20k miles, a couple cosmetic scratches, and maybe $1500 in aftermarket parts.
They are asking 6490 out the door, plus admin, tax and reg... So probably looking more at $7500.
They also have a layaway program that they will hold the bike for me through the harsh New England winter and let me pick it up, ready to go come spring-time, which is the route I'm looking to go.


Other than the cosmetic scratches, which I'm personally not too concerned about, would you say I should go for this?

Here's a link to the ad, currently have a refundable-deposit on it, so nobody can snag it up! :-)


http://www.newenglandpowersports.com/PreownedVehicle/2007-HONDA-CBR600RR7-Motorcycle-for-sale/JH2PC40077M009432


Cheers everyone, and be safe out there!
« Last Edit: October 27, 2015, 09:56:07 AM by 2007CBR600RR »

CDN

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Re: New Member Intro and SHOULD I BUY THIS CBR600RR
« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2015, 12:14:50 PM »
Hi Aidan, do they have any proof of maintenance? And/or receipts for products purchased to maintain the bike? Who installed the aftermarket components? Can you test ride the bike before your deposit? How much tread is on the tires? What does the chain look like? Is it slack? Lubed/waxed? When was the last time the chain was replaced? Did they do sprockets as well? Any fluid on the fork seals when you compress the front end? What colour is the fluid in the brake reservoir (Is it light in colour and translucent or is it dark and murky)? Do all the lights work when they should? What condition is the signal switch in (is it loose or difficult to use?)? Check all the cables from clutch, throttle, and both sets of brake lines. Are the cables worn or loose? Do they operate correctly? Is the throttle loose (does it play or move without actuating? It should have some play but not a lot)? Take a flashlight, how much pad thickness is left on the brake pads?
All of these will be some of the early indications of what state the bike is in. But most importantly it will tell you if it's been maintained. It's a safer buy if it has been and they can prove it. This is important if you A) want to keep the bike for a long time or B) Resale value because the next person who wants to buy the bike is in the exact same position as you are right now. Aside from that some of those things naturally wear down over time, like pads and chain and tires. You'll have to factor buying those for the bike if they are worn down and need replacing. Price out the costs locally and then deduct that from the asking price if you can show the sales rep they need to be done. Remember it's a used bike and maintenance costs money. If you don't have the tools to do it yourself, lots of money. The sales rep has to be able to negotiate some of that out of the used bike. DO NOT just go in there and give him what he is asking. If he can't prove maintenance I'd be weary of the purchase. You have all winter to find a bike, please please do not rush into this. Someone is going to be looking to sell in the next couple months and they WILL have records and it won't cost you extra money.
2003 CBR600RR - LCR Honda MotoGP racing body kit, Watsen Designs flush mount signals, Sunstar sprockets, D.I.D. X-Ring race chain, GPR GPE Titanium Carbon Fibre race pipe, Pazzo shorty gold levers, CustomLED Intergrated rear signal/brake light, Puig fender eliminator, PCV, K&N race air filter

2007CBR600RR

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Re: New Member Intro and SHOULD I BUY THIS CBR600RR
« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2015, 02:35:41 PM »
Hi Aidan, do they have any proof of maintenance? And/or receipts for products purchased to maintain the bike? Who installed the aftermarket components? Can you test ride the bike before your deposit? How much tread is on the tires? What does the chain look like? Is it slack? Lubed/waxed? When was the last time the chain was replaced? Did they do sprockets as well? Any fluid on the fork seals when you compress the front end? What colour is the fluid in the brake reservoir (Is it light in colour and translucent or is it dark and murky)? Do all the lights work when they should? What condition is the signal switch in (is it loose or difficult to use?)? Check all the cables from clutch, throttle, and both sets of brake lines. Are the cables worn or loose? Do they operate correctly? Is the throttle loose (does it play or move without actuating? It should have some play but not a lot)? Take a flashlight, how much pad thickness is left on the brake pads?
All of these will be some of the early indications of what state the bike is in. But most importantly it will tell you if it's been maintained. It's a safer buy if it has been and they can prove it. This is important if you A) want to keep the bike for a long time or B) Resale value because the next person who wants to buy the bike is in the exact same position as you are right now. Aside from that some of those things naturally wear down over time, like pads and chain and tires. You'll have to factor buying those for the bike if they are worn down and need replacing. Price out the costs locally and then deduct that from the asking price if you can show the sales rep they need to be done. Remember it's a used bike and maintenance costs money. If you don't have the tools to do it yourself, lots of money. The sales rep has to be able to negotiate some of that out of the used bike. DO NOT just go in there and give him what he is asking. If he can't prove maintenance I'd be weary of the purchase. You have all winter to find a bike, please please do not rush into this. Someone is going to be looking to sell in the next couple months and they WILL have records and it won't cost you extra money.


Great advice! Thank you so much.
It is a reputable shop, and the one owner before me was actually an employee, and a wrench at the shop. Everything is pretty much pristine from a functional standpoint, though before I go into it any deeper, I will do those last check overs.

The aftermarket exhaust sounds soo sexy it isn't fair and makes it hard to not make a purchase off of emotions! But I will do my very best :-)


Thanks again for your thorough response, and I will be keeping it in my notes for all future bike purchases!

Cheers